Buxus not so sempervirens Posted on August 8, 2017

It was the shock of my gardening life. A phone call from my sister, just back from a week away. ‘Come and see my box.’ The caterpillar had come, and in a mere week had destroyed the entire framework of her garden. Her box hedges are bare, brown, leafless. The only colour is hundreds of green caterpillars crawling and munching and leaving their tiny brown droppings.

Not since Dutch Elm disease killed all our elms in the 1970’s have we seen such devastation of such an essential and universal plant.

My sister lives in a terrace house near Ravenscourt Park. Her garden, leading out from her kitchen, is the centre of her life. Her tomatoes, figs and grapes and apples could supply the family. But the structure of the garden, the chunky parallel hedges culminating in balls of box, is dead, an eyesore to be cleared away – no mean task. And then what?

The RHS website recommends Bugclear as a spray to kill the caterpillars: I’ve used it and it has no effect. Local advice here is that pyrethrum can be effective. You can buy it (until it runs out) under the brand name Py. It is too late, here, for pheromone traps, but I’m following up a new biological insecticide called Topbuxus XenTari that apparently poisons the caterpillars as they feed.

As replacements, substitutes for the box, there are plenty of ideas being mooted. Ilex crenata, teucrium, euonymus all field candidates. Even (and why not for a chunky hedge?) yew.  For my sister’s garden (and mine, when the dread moment comes) I’m contemplating myrtle. I’m not sure how it will react to a strict clipping regime; will it sprout new leaves as willingly as box? And where do I look for dozens of tiny myrtles? But myrtle, like box, has an aura, an ancient garden history, a presence that the other stand-ins can’t claim.

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